Alaska School Activities Association Bans Transgenders from Competing Against Girls in High School Sports

In recent news, the Alaska School Activities Association (ASAA) has taken a firm stance by prohibiting transgender athletes from competing in girls’ divisions in high school sports. This decision comes amidst growing concerns over fair competition and the integrity of women’s sports. Let’s delve deeper…

Veronica Garcia, a 16-year-old transgender high school runner, made headlines by clinching the 400-meter girls’ state championship title in Washington. Despite identifying as male, Garcia competed in the female division and emerged victorious, raising questions about the fairness of such competitions. The ASAA’s decision reflects a commitment to preserving the essence of women’s sports and ensuring a level playing field for all participants.

Veronica Garcia, a 16-year-old transgender athlete from Spokane, Washington, secured the top position in the 400-meter race at the Washington State Track & Field Championships in Tacoma, May 2024. Competing in the female division, Garcia clinched the girls’ state championship title with a remarkable time of 55.75 seconds, surpassing the closest female competitor by a full second.

Lauren Matthew, representing the West Valley School District, trailed Garcia, securing the second spot. Garcia’s victory only highlighted it’s unprincipled expectations and we’ve contributed by allowing its team’s undeserved triumph in the 2A girls team state championship.

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It’s noteworthy that, had Garcia participated in the boys’ division, her performance would have positioned her at 16th place. This fact has spurred discussions about the place of transgender athletes in competitive sports, as Garcia’s transition from previously being known as Davina or Donovan Brown has been a point of interest throughout the season, where she ranked No. 1 in the league and No. 4 in the state.

For perspective, the previous year’s Alaska state track championships saw Ourea Busk from Unalakleet winning the girls’ 400-meter with a time of 1:01.22. In comparison, in the boys’ division, Niko Alvarado of Eielson High School, North Pole, claimed the top spot with a time of 51.78 seconds, notably faster than Garcia’s time.

Moreover, in the current year’s boys’ division in Washington, the winning time for the 400-meter race was an impressive 48.47 seconds, with the last-place runner finishing at 50.73 seconds, again showcasing the competitive disparity between divisions.

ASAA’s decision underscores the importance of upholding the integrity of women’s sports.

Transgenders Don’t Belong in Women’s Sports

The debate surrounding transgender athletes competing in gender-specific sports categories is ridiculous. Maintaining the integrity of women’s sports is crucial. Allowing biological males to compete against females will create disparities in performance and opportunities, potentially undermining the achievements of female athletes.

"Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it." - 1 Corinthians 9:24

Alaska School Activities Association’s Ruling

The ASAA’s ruling sets a precedent for other states and sports organizations grappling with similar challenges. By establishing clear guidelines to address transgender participation in high school sports, the ASAA aims to uphold fairness and protect the rights of female athletes. This decision underscores the importance of maintaining distinct categories based on biological differences to ensure equitable competition.

Representative David Eastman is Solving Transgenderism at the Source!

Rep. Eastman is proactively addressing the critical issue of child abuse by introducing a series of legislative measures designed to combat its underlying factors. House Bills 214 and 213 are focused on protecting children from the abhorrent practice of satanic child sacrifice, the perils associated with Munchausen syndrome by proxy, and the on-going psychological operation of mass-gender dysphoria.

 

House Bill 213: Protecting Minors from Sterilization

House Bill No. 213, introduced by Representative Eastman, tackles a critical issue in the Alaska State Legislature: safeguarding minors from irreversible sterilization. This bill, now referred to the Health and Social Services, State Affairs, and Judiciary Committees, aims to enhance informed consent regulations for individuals under 18, address legal actions related to the sterilization of minors, establish the criminal offense of sterilizing a minor, and amend the statute of limitations for such offenses.

Objective: HB 213 aims to safeguard minors from irreversible sterilization procedures, ensuring that young individuals are not subjected to life-altering medical treatments without proper consent and understanding.

Key Provisions:

  • Informed Consent: Enhances regulations to ensure minors and their guardians fully understand the implications of sterilization procedures.
  • Legal Actions: Allows individuals who were sterilized as minors to sue those responsible, even if consent was given at the time.
  • Criminalization: Establishes the act of sterilizing a minor as a Class A felony, with exceptions only for life-saving procedures or significant health impairments.
  • Statute of Limitations: Extends the time frame for legal actions related to minor sterilization, ensuring justice can be sought even years later.
HOUSE BILL NO. 213
IN THE ALASKA STATE LEGISLATURE
THIRTY-THIRD LEGISLATURE - FIRST SESSION
BY REPRESENTATIVE EASTMAN
Introduced: January 16, 2024
Referred to: Health and Social Services, State Affairs, Judiciary Committees

A BILL FOR AN ACT ENTITLED: "An Act concerning informed consent for individuals under the age of 18; addressing legal actions related to the sterilization of minors; establishing the criminal offense of sterilizing a minor; and amending the statute of limitations."

BE IT ENACTED BY THE ALASKA STATE LEGISLATURE:

Section 1. Amendment to AS 09.55.556:
A new subsection shall be added as follows:
(c) No individual under the age of 18 shall be permitted to consent to any treatment or procedure that results in the irreversible loss of reproductive capabilities.

Section 2. Amendment to AS 09.55 by adding Article 9:
Sec. 09.55.660. Legal actions based on minor sterilization:
(a) Any individual who underwent sterilization while a minor may sue any person responsible for performing or facilitating the sterilization, regardless of prior consent by the individual or their legal guardian.

(b) Should an individual sterilized as a minor be deemed incompetent due to mental illness or disability, the individual's parent or legal guardian may initiate a legal action on their behalf.

(c) For the purposes of this section, "sterilization" refers to any treatment or procedure resulting in permanent infertility.

Section 3. Amendment to AS 11.41 by adding:
Sec. 11.41.240. Criminalization of sterilizing a minor:
(a) It constitutes a criminal offense if a person knowingly performs or assists in the sterilization of a minor.

(b) It is a valid legal defense if the sterilization was necessary to save the minor's life or to prevent significant impairment of their physical health, or if the minor was already infertile prior to the procedure.

(c) This defense is not valid if sterilization is performed due to concerns regarding the minor's potential danger to themselves.

(d) It is not a defense if the procedure was done with consent, if a potential experimental reversal procedure exists, or if new methods to reverse sterilization become available.

(e) "Sterilization" in this context means any treatment or procedure causing permanent infertility.

(f) Sterilization of a minor is classified as a Class A felony.

Section 4. Amendment to AS 12.10.010(a):
Prosecution for specified offenses may commence at any time, including murder, attempted murder, sexual offenses against minors, kidnapping, distribution of child pornography, sex trafficking, human trafficking, and the sterilization of a minor as described in AS 11.41.240.

House Bill 214: Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

House Bill No. 214, introduced by Representative Eastman, addresses a grave issue that demands immediate legislative action: the prohibition of female genital mutilation (FGM). This bill, referred to the Health and Social Services, Labor and Commerce, and Judiciary Committees, aims to criminalize FGM, enforce stringent penalties, and ensure protective measures for minors.

Objective: HB 214 addresses the grave issue of FGM, aiming to criminalize the practice and protect minors from this harmful procedure.

Key Provisions:

  • Criminalization: Makes performing, facilitating, or consenting to FGM on minors a felony.
  • Medical Exceptions: Only allows the procedure if performed by a licensed healthcare provider for legitimate medical reasons connected to childbirth or correcting anatomical anomalies.
  • Permanent Revocation: Mandates permanent revocation of medical licenses for those convicted of performing FGM, ensuring strict penalties for offenders.
  • Educational Measures: Requires the Department of Health to implement programs to educate the public about the dangers and illegality of FGM.
House Bill No. 214

In the Legislature of the State of Alaska
Thirty-Third Legislature - Second Session
By Representative Eastman

Introduced: January 16, 2024
Referred to: Health and Social Services, Labor and Commerce, Judiciary Committees

A Bill For An Act Entitled "An Act relating to the prohibition of female genital mutilation; pertaining to medical practices; concerning the regulation of direct-entry midwives; addressing nursing practices; modifying criminal law and procedure; revising sentencing guidelines; detailing the responsibilities of the Department of Health; and amending Rule 505(a) of the Alaska Rules of Evidence."

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Alaska:

Section 1. AS 08.64.331 is to be amended with a new subsection as follows:
(g) The medical board shall permanently revoke a license under (a)(1) of this section if the licensee is found guilty of violating AS 11.41.275. However, a permanent revocation shall not occur if the conviction has been overturned upon appeal, or if the appeal process has not yet concluded.

Section 2. AS 08.65.120 is to be amended with a new subsection as follows:
(f) The relevant board shall permanently revoke any certification or permit under (a)(1) of this section if the holder is convicted of violating AS 11.41.275. Revocation shall not occur if the conviction is under appeal or the appeal rights remain.

Section 3. AS 08.68.275 is to be amended with a new subsection as follows:
(g) The nursing board shall permanently revoke any license or permit under (a)(1) of this section upon finding that the holder has been convicted of violating AS 11.41.275. Revocation will not occur if the conviction is under appeal or appeal rights have not been exhausted.

Section 4. AS 11.41 is to be amended with a new section as follows:
Sec. 11.41.275. Female Genital Mutilation.
(a) A person is guilty of female genital mutilation if they:
(1) knowingly perform this procedure on a female under 18 years of age;
(2) facilitate the removal of a female under 18 from the state for this procedure;
(3) transport or facilitate transport within the state for this purpose;
(4) as a parent, guardian or custodian, consent to or permit the procedure on a female under 18 years of age.

(b) It is a valid defense if the procedure was:
(1) performed by a licensed health care provider within their professional scope; and
(2) necessary for medical reasons connected to childbirth or correcting an anomaly.

(c) Defenses not allowed include:
(1) actions in accordance with religious beliefs, customs, or consent of the minor; and
(2) disclosure of confidential spousal communications, with spouses able to testify.

(d) Definitions:
(1) "female genital mutilation" encompasses any harmful procedure to female genitalia;
(2) "licensed health care provider" includes physicians, midwives, nurses, etc.

(e) The crime of female genital mutilation is classified as an unclassified felony.

Sections 5-11 of the bill detail the amendments to the existing state law, including sentencing guidelines for those found guilty of female genital mutilation, the duties of the Department of Health in educating and preventing this practice, and the applicability and conditional effect of the new provisions.

House Bill 211: Liability of Public Health Officials

House Bill No. 211, introduced by Representative Eastman, aims to enhance accountability measures for public health officials in Alaska. This bill, which has been referred to the Health and Social Services and Judiciary Committees, suggests the implementation of personal liability for public health officials in instances where their negligent, reckless, or deliberate misconduct results in harm while issuing public health guidance, recommendations, or mandates.

Objective: HB 211 seeks to hold public health officials accountable for negligent, reckless, or deliberate misconduct when issuing public health guidance, recommendations, or mandates.

Key Provisions:

  • Personal Liability: Establishes that public health officials can be held personally liable for harm caused by their actions or recommendations if they are negligent or reckless.
  • Verification of Information: Requires that officials independently verify the accuracy and appropriateness of the public health advice they provide, ensuring accountability.
  • Scope of Liability: Applies to all state-employed or locally-employed licensed medical or public health professionals issuing public health mandates.
House Bill No. 211
In the Legislature of the State of Alaska
Thirty-Third Legislature - Second Session
Sponsored by Representative Eastman
Introduced on January 16, 2024
Referred to Committees on Health and Social Services, Judiciary

A Bill For an Act Titled "An Act Relating to the Liability of Public Health Officials."

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Alaska:

Section 1. AS 09.50 is to be amended by adding a new section to read:
Section 09.50.255. Liability of Public Health Officials. 
(a) Any public health official, operating within their official capacity, shall bear personal liability for any harm caused due to their negligent, reckless, or purposeful misconduct when providing public health guidance, recommendations, or mandates to the government or general public.

(b) A public health official who disseminates public health guidance, recommendations, or mandates, or endorses such information from another source, without independently verifying the accuracy and appropriateness of the advice is considered negligent and is subject to civil liability as per subsection (a).

(c) For the purposes of this section, the term "public health official" refers to any state-employed or locally-employed licensed medical or public health professional.

Section 2. The uncodified law of the State of Alaska is to be amended by adding a new section to read:
Applicability. This Act will apply to any public health guidance, recommendations, or mandates issued by a public health official from the date this Act comes into effect.

Remember to stay informed and check back for updates on this evolving story.

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